This sleeping mat is a very recent purchase so I have not logged any days out in the wilderness with it. Therefore this is more of a quick hands-on than a thorough review on the Exped Synmat Hyperlite M.

The first thought that comes to mind when you get your hands on this mat is: wow, that’s a small pack size for an R-value of 3.3. And the second thought: wow, that’s light as hell (at 350g). So really, the question is: is it comfortable enough? Durable enough? Is it comfortable in practice?

Packing the mat

Well actually, for me, the first question is: can I pack it down to the same size as it came in. I’m a terrible packer and will have trouble packing most anything (tents, sleeping mats, etc.) down into small enough size to fit the stuffsack it came in.

In that respect, the Eped Synmat Hyperlite wins top marks. It is very easy to pack down to fit it’s storage pouch (as can be seen in this youtube video). For that alone, take my money.

Fabric

The fabric is quite non-slipping. Some of the more lightweight mats are known for their slippage, which means that an unwitting sleeper may well end up sleeping off the mat. Not a big fear with this mat. Also, it is not quite as noisy as some of the other ultralight mats. The fabric does not squeak and crinkle under your weight.

Inflating and deflating

I really liked the valve. It was easy to fill as the valve blocks air from coming out so you can take a breath after a few blows. There’s also a stuff sack that you can also you to fill it mat, but you have to buy it separately. Deflating is also quick since the valve’s opening handle can be used to jam the valve open which makes getting all the air out easy.

Mat size

I have the mat in size medium, that’s because I’m short (shorter than 5′ 7″). So for once my height is good for something, namely buying the small size mat for lighter gear. There are in addition the Medium Wide (MW) and Long wide (LW) versions. Unless you are dead set on eliminating weight (which makes sense for some), I recommend getting the size you think will provide you with a good night’s sleep.

Although I’m short, I do have some width so the M is actually a bit short for me. But I’m not very restless sleeper so I think I can easily work with the M size.

Sleeping on it

The sleeping pad has an R-value of 3.3, which in theory makes it a three-season mat. Having said that, I’ve slept many a winter night on a cell foam sleeping pad roughly corresponding to Ridgerest Solite’s R-value of 2.8 with no particular problems. I would therefore use this in all but the harshest winter conditions without worry.

In practice, if I’m packing a backpack, I’ll rely on the Exped alone. For harsh weather winter expeditions with ahkio / pulka / sled to haul the gear in, it is easy to pack multiple sleeping mats. Then I prefer a cell foam mat covering the whole tent floor together with a Ridgerest cell foam for comfort.

Summary

It’s a very lightweight and small bag that works well with well thought out details despite it’s small weight. Durability is reportedly good but remains to be seen. I will update this post as I gain more nights on the mat.

Buy on Amazon

If you want to help support this site, consider buying the mat using the link below.
Exped Synmat Hyperlite Sleeping Pad One Color, LW

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Kalle
I am a software engineer by day and outdoors aficionado whenever family life allows. I live in Finland and have roots in Finnish Lapland so arctic outdoors are close to my heart. Special interests include outdoors photography, packrafting, ski trekking and ski expeditions.

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